Tumbler Ridge Community Forest

Tumbler Ridge Community Forest Ltd. has secured 22,000 hectares of Crown land through a 25 year agreement that will allow the District of Tumbler Ridge to harvest 20,000 cubic metres of timber each year.


About This Project

The community forest agreement is for a 25-year term and grants the right to harvest 20,000 cubic metres of timber per year from about 22,000 hectares of Crown land in the Dawson Creek Timber Supply Area. The District of Tumbler Ridge plans to use the forest licence to mitigate wildfire risks by reducing fuels in the surrounding forests that have been impacted by the mountain pine beetle infestation. Timber from the community forest will be used to supply West Fraser and Canfor sawmills in nearby Chetwynd, supporting existing jobs in the local forest sector and creating a new revenue stream for the District of Tumbler Ridge.

Tumbler Ridge’s forest has a total volume of 1.8 million cubic metres of harvestable wood. The Community Forest includes three separate tracts of land located within 25 kilometres of the municipal boundary. The main parcel of land includes a wide expansion of forest on both sides of the Murray River, extending as far north from town as Teepee Creek, and the forested area surrounding the town. A smaller parcel lies to the south of the town, adjacent to the Tumbler Ridge airport.

Having the community forest encompass the town means more control over wildfire mitigation and a better ability for the district to protect the groundwater aquifer that underlies the town and provides drinking water. Beetle-killed timber will also help Tumbler Ridge in its pursuit of bioenergy production to provide the community with a stable back-up power supply to prevent extended outages.

Community forest agreements are a form of legal tenure that enable communities to more fully participate in the stewardship of local Crown forest resources. They are area-based, and give communities exclusive rights to harvest timber, as well as the opportunity to manage and profit from other forest resources such as botanical products, recreation, wildlife, water and scenic view-scapes. Currently, more than 50 community forests are operating or are in the planning stages in British Columbia.

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